Get in Touch ! +91.22.26771188 | +91.22.26773600

Articles

Preparing for Cataract Surgery and Choosing an IOL

Prior to cataract surgery, your optometrist and/or ophthalmologist will perform a comprehensive eye exam to check the overall health of your eyes, evaluate whether there are reasons why you should not have surgery and identify any risk factors you might have.

Cataract surgery with phacoemulsification
Phacoemulsification in cataract surgery involves insertion of a tiny, hollowed tip that uses high frequency (ultrasonic) vibrations to "break up" the eye's cloudy lens (cataract). The same tip is used to suction out the lens.

Cataract surgery with phacoemulsification
After the eye's natural lens is removed during cataract surgery, an artificial or intraocular lens is implanted to take its place.

A refraction also will be performed to accurately determine the amount of nearsightednessfarsightedness and/or astigmatism you have prior to surgery. Additional measurements of your eyes will be taken to determine the curvature of your cornea and the length of your eye.

These measurements are essential to help your cataract surgeon select the proper power of the intraocular lens and give you the best vision possible after surgery.

Today you have many types of IOLs to choose from for your cataract surgery, depending on your specific needs. In addition to IOLs that correct nearsightedness and farsightedness, there are now toric IOLs that correct astigmatism as well.

If you don't mind wearing glasses after cataract surgery, a monofocal lens implant usually is used. Often, only part-time use of reading glasses is needed after cataract surgery with monofocal IOLs. But if prescription eyeglasses are needed (which often is the case if you only need cataract surgery in one eye), your eye doctor typically will prescribe new glasses for you approximately one month after surgery.

If you like the idea of being less dependent on glasses after cataract surgery, one way to correct presbyopia and reduce your need for reading glasses is to have your cataract surgeon adjust the power of one of your monofocal IOLs (assuming you have cataract surgery performed in both eyes) to give you a monovision correction, similar to monovision with contact lenses.

Another option is to choose one of a variety of advanced presbyopia-correcting IOLs to improve your reading vision without sacrificing your distance vision. Presbyopia-correcting IOLs include accommodating IOLs and multifocal IOLs; both types are designed to provide a greater range of vision after cataract surgery than conventional monofocal IOLs.

Be aware that not everyone is a good candidate for these premium IOLs, and choosing a presbyopia-correcting IOL will increase the out-of-pocket cost of your cataract surgery, since the added cost of these advanced lens implants is not covered by Medicare or other insurance plans.

Prior to cataract surgery, in addition to discussing the different types of IOLs, you will be advised about what to expect before, during and after your procedure. This information — which may be presented orally, in writing, via a video presentation or a combination of all three — is meant to help you make an informed decision about whether to proceed with surgery.

If you have any questions or concerns about cataract surgery, be sure to discuss them with your eye doctor and cataract surgeon prior to signing "informed consent" documents authorizing surgery.

Also, discuss with your eye doctor all medications you are taking, including non-prescription ("over-the-counter") formulations and nutritional supplements. Some medications and supplements can increase your risk of cataract surgery complications and might need to be discontinued prior to surgery. Ask your doctor for details.

IOL Lenses Categories

MONOFOCAL MULTIFOCAL ACCOMODATING TORIC IOL
Tradition Lens Acrilisa IOL
RESTOR®, Tecnis® IOL
Cristalens® ACRYSOF® IQ Toric
aspheric IOL
Provides good vision at one distance
(typically far vision)
Correct vision for near, far and intermediate distance Correct vision for all ranges of vision using a hinge monofocal lens that moves within the eye like the natural lens of the eye Corrects for astigmatism after cataract surgery
Requires reading glasses after surgery May substantially reduce the need for glasses* May substantially reduce the need for glasses for distance and intermediate vision* May substantially reduce astigmatism after cataract surgery


Cataract Surgery Recovery

An uncomplicated cataract surgery typically lasts only about 15 minutes. But expect to be at the surgical center for 90 minutes or longer, because extra time is needed to prepare you for surgery (dilating your pupil; administering pre-operative medication) and for a brief post-operative evaluation and instructions about your cataract surgery recovery before you leave.

You must have someone drive you home after cataract surgery; do not attempt to drive until you have visited your eye doctor the day after surgery and he or she tests your vision and confirms that you are safe to drive.

You will be prescribed medicated eye drops to use several times each day for a few weeks after cataract surgery. You also must wear your protective eye shield while sleeping or napping for about a week after surgery. To protect your eyes from sunlight and other bright light as your eye recovers, you will be given a special pair of post-operative sunglasses.

Also, many centers require someone to be with you after cataract surgery if you received anesthesia. Be sure to ask about this requirement prior to your cataract procedure so you are prepared for surgery day.

While your eye heals, you might experience some eye redness and blurred vision during the first few days or even weeks following the procedure.

During at least the first week of your recovery, it is essential that you avoid:

  • Strenuous activity and heavy lifting (nothing over 25 pounds).
  • Bending, exercising and similar activities that might stress your eye while it is healing.
  • Water that might splash into your eye and cause infection. Keep your eye closed while showering or bathing. Also, avoid swimming or hot tubs for at least two weeks.
  • Any activity that would expose your healing eye to dust, grime or other infection-causing contaminants.

Your cataract surgeon may give you other instructions and recommendations for your cataract surgery recovery, depending on your specific needs and the outcome of your procedure. If you have any questions at any time after cataract surgery, call your eye doctor for advice.

If you need cataract surgery in both eyes, your surgeon typically will prefer that you wait one to three weeks between procedures, so your first eye has healed sufficiently and you have good vision in that eye before the second surgery is performed.

Cataract

What is Cataract? Our eye has a natural lens inside it which focuses light to the back of the eye so that we can see. When there is a bu... Read More

Lasik

Lasik Eye Surgery, which is the short form for "Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis", is commonly known asLaser Eye Surgery. Using a la... Read More